Posted in 1960's Singles

(Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay – Otis Redding (1968)

When I started to write this blog it was with the intent on covering my vinyl singles and albums I had bought during the 70’s and 80’s. I have many CD’s and downloads but lately with a revival of vinyl I’ve been to the odd Record Fair and shops that specialise in selling used vinyl.

mcatub
Stax Records 601031

I took a trip down to London in early 2015 and ventured into a store called Flashback Records at 50 Essex Road, N1. A collectors dream, floor to ceiling vinyl with every genre you could image of used records. I came across this for £1 and couldn’t pass up the opportunity to buy.

Otis Redding was born Dawson, Georgia in 1941, and died in a plane crash aged only 26 just around the time his music had just began being appreciated not just by record buyers but by fellow artists, writers and producers. His style of soul and blues began to have a crossover pop audience, and this single was recorded November/December  1967 just days before his death. (Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay  was released in January 1968 and became a posthumous #1 hit on both the US Billboard Rhythm and Blues Chart and the Hot 100 pop Chart. It peaked at #3 in the UK staying on the top 50 for 15 weeks. Although Otis released many singles in the UK this was his only solo top ten entry. He did have a couple of top 40 hits with Carla Thomas.

wp_20160518_005_zps9exrv1kp
B-Side My Sweet Lorene

On the dock is often said to be about Otis himself where the lyrics talk about moving from his home base of Georgia to the Californian coast at San Francisco and his experience of writing. Producer Steve Cropper collaborated on the lyrics just on a few lines that Otis gave him. It was certified in the US with a Gold disc for sales over 1 million. The song also hit the top twenty is some european countries such as The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland and Norway where it reached #2.

The B-side track My Sweet Lorene is pure Blues/Soul written with Isaac Hayes and Alvertis Isbell, the story of a plea for Lorene to come home and the longing for the lost past relationship.

Advertisements

Author:

Fan of music. I've been buying records, cassettes, and CD's since the mid 1970's. I'm currently converting some of my vinyl to mp3. Because of this I've been reconnecting with my music collection.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s